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Matthew Campbell
Matthew Campbell

Who Would Buy My Used Car __TOP__


No list of the best places to sell your car would be complete without at least mentioning Craigslist. The site has been around since the dawn of the internet and remains a popular choice for vehicle shoppers. Craigslist charges $5 to place a vehicle advertisement, which helps to reduce the number of scammers on the site. However, you should still be wary of scams from illegitimate buyers when either buying or selling a car on Craigslist.




who would buy my used car



On the other hand, maybe you already received a low-ball offer when trying to trade in your Subaru, for example, for a new Toyota. Take your car to the nearest Subaru dealer, which may be willing to pay more, knowing it has customers waiting for a used vehicle like yours.


First you must choose between buying a new car and buying a used car. A new car may cost more but will come with a longer warranty and no history of abuse or neglect. However, new cars depreciate (lose value) almost immediately when they leave the new car lot, which means that if you can find a well-cared-for used car, it might be a good bargain.


Consider the price of the car. This sounds obvious, but car dealers, new or used, may tempt you with a low monthly payment. You should be sure to look at the total price of the car, including interest.


Don't just assume you will finance through the dealer. Sometimes, you can get better financing from your bank or credit union. You should also check your credit score before you go shopping as this can affect the terms such as the interest rate you are offered. By shopping around, you may be able to negotiate a better deal. Note that Texas law sets maximum interest rates for financing used cars. The rates vary according to the age of the car and the amount owed on it.


All used car dealers are required by federal law to tell buyers whether a used car is being sold with or without a warranty. Dealers must clearly display this information on a side window of each used car. This buyer's guide, or window form, should state either:


The law prohibits rolling back or changing the number of miles on an odometer. Texas law requires the seller of any used vehicle to state on the title assignment the total number of miles the vehicle has traveled. Make sure you get a copy of the odometer statement when you sign the contract.


The financier might also require you to have collision insurance to cover the balance owed on the car. If it is required and you do not have it, the financier can repossess your car. Before agreeing to allow the financier or the dealer to obtain insurance for you, shop around. Generally speaking, you will pay less for insurance you purchase yourself than you would for insurance purchased by your financier or arranged by the dealer. Understand all your insurance responsibilities before you sign.


When you buy a used vehicle, the dealer must certify, in writing, that it is "in condition and repair to render, under normal use, satisfactory and adequate service upon the public highway at the time of delivery." The dealer certification covers the entire vehicle except items that would be obvious to the customer before the sale, such as torn upholstery, missing hubcaps, etc. The vehicle also must have all safety equipment and emissions controls required by state and federal laws for the vehicle's model year.


A vehicle with this label has been repaired or constructed with a glider kit, but not one manufactured in two or more stages. A glider kit includes all components of a vehicle except the power train. It is generally used to rebuild heavy trucks or tractors that have been extensively damaged. Passenger cars built from custom kits are not considered reconstructed vehicles.


For a used vehicle purchased from a New York State registered dealer - the proof of ownership is the Certificate of Title (MV-999), or a transferable registration for 1972 and older models, signed over to the dealer, and the dealer's Certificate of Sale (MV-50) showing ownership transfer to you. The dealer must complete, and you must acknowledge by signing, the appropriate odometer and damage disclosure statements.


For a used vehicle bought from a private seller - the proof of ownership is the Certificate of Title (MV-999), or a transferable registration for 1972 or older models, signed over to you. The seller must complete, and you must acknowledge by signing, the appropriate odometer and damage disclosure statements.


New York State's new and used car lemon laws provide legal remedies for consumers who buy or lease cars. If a car does not live up to the written warranty and cannot be repaired - or if it has not been repaired correctly after a reasonable number of attempts - the consumer could receive a refund or replacement car.


Your car broke down, and now you're faced with a high repair bill. It's not the first time this has happened, and you're getting tired of pouring money into an aging machine. A new car would be nice, but is that the smartest decision? Would you be better off fixing your current ride, or is it really time to buy another one? There's no clear-cut answer to these questions, but we can show the pros and cons for each option to help you make a more informed decision.


  • It is almost always less expensive to repair a car than buy a new one.

  • Although something as severe as a blown motor or a failed transmission will run you between $3,000 and $7,000 to replace at a dealership, such repairs still don't cost as much as buying a new car. That $3,000 or $7,000 would certainly make a nice down payment, but then there are the monthly payments to consider. You can perhaps purchase a used car for that much, but just keep in mind that another used car could come with its own set of issues.

  • Insurance and registration fees will be higher on a new car.

  • A new car typically loses an estimated 22 percent of its value in the first year. Your car has already taken that depreciation hit.

  • You really need the car to last a while longer. Let's say you were planning on getting a new car in a year or two, but it broke down earlier than expected. Repairing it now will help you stay on the road and keep you from making a hasty new car purchase. It will also give you more time to save up and get your finances in order.

  • You have a sentimental attachment to your car. Maybe it was your first car, a gift from a loved one, or a dream car you finally were able to purchase. For you, buying a new car would mean giving up an old friend. This is not the strongest argument for fixing it up, but it's a real one.



You swore you wouldn't put another penny into your old car after that last repair. But buying a new car seems like an intimidating prospect. Here are a few reasons why buying a new car might be the way to go.


You don't want to fret about future breakdowns. Old cars can be unpredictable. Repairing a single problem with an older car doesn't guarantee that another breakdown won't happen with another part or system. If you buy a new car, its warranty means you'll have at least three years (and often far longer) before you have to worry about paying for any major repairs. Even buying a more reliable used car, such as a certified pre-owned vehicle, is enough to bring back some peace of mind.


If you are looking into selling your car in the Englewood area, visit us at our Ford dealership. We are expanding our used car inventory and we want to buy your used car, truck or SUV. We will offer you the trade-in value you deserve no matter what make and model it is. You can sell and walk away or trade-in for a new Ford vehicle, which ever option you choose we have you covered. Contact us today for more information!


The process of a private sale for your used car can be a big hassle. Unless you have a buyer you will have to invest some effort. This can include classifieds, listing the car online, taking phone calls or texts, taking strangers for a test drive. On top of that, private buyer will have more questions and be more concerned about all that car parts. If you sell or trade us your vehicle here at Englewood Ford, we can avoid you all those hassles and save you time.


At Englewood Ford, we will apply the offer we make on the used vehicle you sell or trade us to the price of the car, truck or SUV you are purchasing. This offset means lower payments and a larger down payment.


Most car dealers who sell used vehicles must comply with the Federal Trade Commission's (FTC's) Used Car Rule. In fact, car dealers who sell, or offer for sale, more than five used vehicles in a 12-month period must comply with the Rule. Banks and financial institutions are exempt from the Rule, as are businesses that sell vehicles to their employees, and lessors who sell a leased vehicle to a lessee, an employee of the lessee, or a buyer found by the lessee.


The Used Car Rule applies in all states except Maine and Wisconsin. These two states are exempt because they have similar regulations that require dealers to post disclosures on used vehicles. The Rule applies in the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and American Samoa.


You must post a Buyers Guide before you display a vehicle for sale or let a customer inspect it for the purpose of buying it, even if the car is not fully prepared for delivery. You also must display a Buyers Guide on used vehicles for sale on your lot through consignment, power of attorney, or other agreement. At public auctions, dealers and the auction company must comply. The Rule does not apply at auctions that are closed to consumers.


Previously titled or not, any vehicle driven for purposes other than moving or test driving is considered a used vehicle, including light-duty vans, light-duty trucks, demonstrators, and program cars that meet the following specifications:


State Law. In some states, use of the "As Is-No Dealer Warranty" Buyers Guide may be legally sufficient to eliminate implied warranties. In other states "as is" sales are allowed only if specific action is taken or certain language is used. For example, some states may require you to eliminate implied warranties by using special language and/or a document other than the Guide. 041b061a72


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